Prison & Occupational Therapy

 

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I recently received an email from Sandra Rogers. She is a faculty member in the School of Occupational Therapy (OT) at Pacific University. In part, this is how the email read:

 

Dear Steven,

My name is Sandra Rogers, I am a faculty member in the School of OT at Pacific University. I am writing to request help with a project I am working on. I work and mentor a group of occupational therapists who work in criminal justice (prison, jail, and community corrections) throughout the US. Occupational therapists believe that engaging in meaningful activities is important no matter your circumstances. In correctional facilities OT’s work with those incarcerated to help them develop and practice skills that lead to engagement in healthy lifestyles, like work that you enjoy, leisure interests that are fulfilling (and do not harm others), taking care of children or families, having relationships that are meaningful and healthy. We term the lack of engagement in meaningful activities occupational deprivation. I think you are a very good example of how engaging in meaningful activities, even while incarcerated, can really help you maintain health. I have read your blog and book, your wonderful relationship with your wife, and have been reading your adventures with Yahoo. I am wondering if you would be willing to talk to me about your experience of engaging in these activities and how they have helped you. IF you are willing I would love to videotape or share your written comments with the group of OT’s I mentor, and use your comments in a presentation I am doing. I would be very interested in hearing your thoughts from a lived perspective, of having to deal with the consequences of the crime, and still trying to do good in the world. I think it would be helpful for the audience to understand how you personally were affected by occupational deprivation.

~Sandra Rogers

 

How awesome is that? I share this because IT in itself is “meaningful activity” to me. She and I have exchanged emails about working together and I am super excited about all of this. She’ll be interviewing me via email, phone calls, and video visitations. And I will be sure to blog this experience here for you all to read.

This blog is “meaningful activity” and has enriched my life tremendously.

I look forward to working with Sandra. This experience will be both educational and healing. It’ll also give me the opportunity to acquire new tools to help myself and others.

After reading her first email I learned the term “meaningful activities” and the crucial role they play in a healthy lifestyle. I am so excited about this learning journey I’m about to embark upon. Nothing gets me more excited, except for my wife and our upcoming EFV’s! 🙂

Already, Sandra has inspired deep, intellectual, soul searching thought. As a result, I have decided to write an ongoing blog series based solely on the food-for-thought which she inspires. The following three titles were derived from the very words she wrote in her initial email to me. I will kick start this series with:

 

#1) HOW I WAS AFFECTED BY OCCUPATIONAL DEPRIVATION

#2) CONSEQUENCES OF MY CRIME INSPIRE GREAT CHANGE

#3) ENGAGING IN MEANINGFUL ACTIVITIES IS CRUCIAL TO A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE

 

It is my greatest hope that this blog will plant seeds that will somehow reach your incarcerated loved one (or anyone else for that matter) and inspire positive change in those lives.

 

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Steven Jennings

 

no limits ahead

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4 thoughts on “Prison & Occupational Therapy

  1. Tamara Light says:

    I am so happy for you it sounds like this is a great opportunity to share with others what you in a professional environment what you have gone through and taken from your experiences. Great job Steven!! I’m sure Suzie is super excited for you 😀

    Liked by 2 people

    • Sharron says:

      What a great opportunity for you to share your thoughts and help the very people who are trying to show, that having inmates engage in meaningful activities, provides a better environment to reduce both violence and depravation as well as reduce the recidivism rate. It’s a wonderful opportunity for you.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Michael Moore says:

    Well done! Thanks to your sharing and blogging, the OT will be enhanced for others. My wife and I have talked a lot about the difference between what the system is in too many cases (Retributive “Justice” and I use that term loosely since we seem to have no issues with prisons for profit in this country) and what it should be (Restorative Justice which we are doing in the Youth program in our school in Estes Park with the Police Department and expanding to non-violent offenders).

    Liked by 1 person

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