How To Engage Those Who Continue With Misconduct

 

art10403widea

 

For years I engaged in misconduct. As a matter of fact, I pretty much wrote a book on it. It’s called, “Stone City: Life In The Penitentiary.” Today I reflect back to those sad days (and beyond) and I ask myself, “What could’ve reached me? What would’ve it taken for me to change my negative lifestyle?”

The answer is clear: meaningful activities that inspire intrinsic motivation, guidance, mentoring, and I needed mental practitioners who would’ve constantly provided positive reinforcements.

I dream and hope for a program that could change countless lives all over the country. The details are complexed, but the concept is simple:

PHASE ONE:
Offer programs that inspire intrinsic motivation. Every state has multiple correctional facilities. So implement specific programs in the facilities that are best suited for those specific programs. For example, one facility could specialize in automotive and mechanic programs, while another facility specializes in animals and veterinarian programs. Lessen the criteria of these programs and make them available to those who have never had such opportunities.

PHASE TWO:
Strategically place mental practitioners around the facility to offer positive reinforcement, mentoring, encouragement, etc.

PHASE THREE:
Work with outside companies that will hire some of these highly skilled men the second they’re released.

If this simple, realistic concept was properly implemented nationwide, I guarantee the recidivism rate would be lower than the current 66%.

Please read: How To Keep Juvenile Delinquents From Coming To Prison

 

abc

Steven Jennings

Advertisements

One thought on “How To Engage Those Who Continue With Misconduct

  1. Sharron says:

    There is a non-profit program in Las Vegas on the outside that embodies all those things. It is Hope for Prisoners. Run by an ex-felon, it has a recidivism rate of 6.5% for those who complete the 18 month program. Working in conjunction with other agencies, they provide services needed for people when they are released from jails and prisons.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s